Expander Set
a compendium of the inspiring and the inspired
Expander Set
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workman:

museumuesum:
Diane Arbus


Headless man, N.Y.C., 1962

gelatin silver print, 20 x 16 inches
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ffffffound:

(no title)
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feru-leru:

guiño. by Javier eme Castro on Flickr.
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roelofsart:

Salvador Dalí (1904‑1989)
Metamorphosis of Narcissus
1937Oil on canvas
511 x 781 mm
Collection Tate
Purchased 1979
This painting is Dalí’s interpretation of the Greek myth of Narcissus. Narcissus was a youth of great beauty who loved only himself and broke the hearts of many lovers. The gods punished him by letting him see his own reflection in a pool. He fell in love with it, but discovered he could not embrace it and died of frustration. Relenting, the gods immortalised him as the narcissus (daffodil) flower. For this picture Dalí used a meticulous technique which he described as ‘hand-painted colour photography’ to depict with hallucinatory effect the transformation of Narcissus, kneeling in the pool, into the hand holding the egg and flower. Narcissus as he was before his transformation is seen posing in the background. The play with ‘double images’ sprang from Dalí’s fascination with hallucination and delusion.
This was Dalí’s first painting to be made entirely in accordance with the paranoiac critical method, which the artist described as a ‘Spontaneous method of irrational knowledge, based on the critical-interpretative association of the phenomena of delirium’ (The Conquest of the Irrational, published in The Secret Life of Salvador Dalí, New York 1942). 
http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/dali-metamorphosis-of-narcissus-t02343
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roelofsart:

Jacques-Louis David
The Death of Marat (French: La Mort de Marat or Marat Assassiné) is a painting by Jacques-Louis David of the murdered French revolutionary leader Jean-Paul Marat. It is one of the most famous images of the Revolution. David was the leading French painter, as well as a Montagnard and a member of the revolutionary Committee of General Security. The painting shows the radical journalist lying dead in his bath on 13 July 1793 after his murder by Charlotte Corday. Painted in the months after Marat’s murder, it has been described by T. J. Clark as the first modernist painting, for “the way it took the stuff of politics as its material, and did not transmute it”.
1793oil on canvas165 cm × 128 cm (65 in × 50 in)Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium
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phasesphrasesphotos:

Stan Steinberg
1962
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hragv:

#Williamsburg bridge